Brown Butter Miso Spread

I think this might be my favourite thing to make with miso. It tastes like condensed milk and toffee, with a depth of savouriness that is impossible to describe.  It’s so delicious I’ve been eating it straight from the jar – not something I advise as it is basically just butter, cream and miso!!

This brown butter spread can be used in all your cake/biscuit recipes to replace the normal butter – giving all your bakes an extra depth of flavour that will impress even the most sceptical of miso eaters. Or it can be spread onto pancakes, waffles, or anywhere else you need butter with an extra special quality.

This recipe was given to me by the incredibly knowledgeable Cooking with Q. Follow him on YouTube or Instagram for lots more ideas for cooking with fermented foods. 

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5 from 1 vote

Miso Brown Butter Spread

This butter will add an amazing depth of flavour to all cakes or biscuits - or you can spread it on pancakes/waffles. You can even eat it straight from the jar!
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Course: Ingredient
Cuisine: Fusion
Keyword: Butter, miso, spread

Ingredients

  • 300 g double cream
  • 300 g unsalted butter
  • 75 g light olive oil
  • 200 g miso (a sweet white miso gives a sweeter taste; whilst a darker aged one will give one with a deeper flavour)
  • 75 g water
  • 5 g lecithin

Instructions

  • Gently boil the double cream until most of the water has evaporated and the cream begins to change colour.
  • Add the butter and continue to boil, stirring frequently. It will look as though it has curdled, but don't worry - this is normal!
  • When the butter begins to change remove from the heat and transfer to a heatproof bowl to cool.
    Brown butter
  • Whilst the butter is cooling, add the miso, water and lecithin to a blender and blend until smooth. With the blender still running, slowly pour the oil into the mixture.
  • When the butter has cooled, slowly add the butter mixture to the running blender, ensuring all solids are transferred across too.
  • You can now transfer the mixture to a freezer for long term storage or whip it with a hand mixer to produce a fluffy pale mixture - which can be used straight away or stored in a fridge for a few weeks.

Mirin Recipe

Mirin

Mirin is a sweet wine used in Japanese cookery. In the UK we’re most familiar with its use in teriyaki sauce, but it is used in a wide range of other Japanese dishes.

Traditionally mirin is made from shochu, a Japanese spirit usually made from sweet potato. Shochu is difficult (and expensive) to get hold of  in the UK, so I’ve used vodka.

It’s really easy to make – just mix koji, cooked rice, and a neutral tasting spirit. Then leave at room temperature for 2 – 3 months. I mixed 300ml vodka, 100g koji and 100g of cooled, cooked rice. 

After 3 months the mirin develops a rich golden colour. At this stage you can strain off the solids or leave it to mature further. I like to leave the solids in the liquid, carefully pouring off the amount I’d like to use for each recipe. This means I get the best of both worlds – the ability to use it now and for it to mature further with time.

Much of the mirin available in the UK is made from sweetners and not produced in the traditional way. By creating your own mirin you get to experience a product that is naturally fermented and rich in nutrients.

Vodka Mirin

Mirin is a sweet wine used in Japanese cookery. It is easy to make and much tastier than commercially available products which are no longer produced in the traditional way.
Prep Time10 mins
Fermentation Time90 d
Course: Ingredient
Cuisine: Japanese
Keyword: Koji, mirin, rice wine

Ingredients

  • 300 ml vodka
  • 100 g koji
  • 100 g cooked rice cooled

Instructions

  • Mix the ingredients in a clean bottle
  • Leave to mature for 3 months
  • Strain off the solids and enjoy the mirin in teriyaki or your favourite Japanese dish